Color Palette

  • Aquablue

    Low Impact Dye

  • Black

    Low Impact Dye

    True Black

  • Canary

    Low Impact Dye

  • Celery

    Clay Dye

    Light/Medium green with slight yellow undertones

  • Citrine

    Clay Dye

    A soft, buttery yellow

  • Coral

    Low Impact Dye

  • Grape

    Low Impact Dye

    Bright purple

  • Henna

    Clay Dye

    The deep color of sun dried clay

  • Jade

    Clay Dye

    Pale emerald

  • Malachite

    Clay Dye

    Medium green with blue undertones

  • Mosaic Blue

    Low Impact Dye

    Bright medium blue with darker undertones

  • Moss

    Clay Dye

    A light creamy cucumber green

  • Mud

    Clay Dye

    A rich coffee color

  • Natural

    No Dye

    Off white

  • Olive

    Clay Dye

  • Orchid

    Low Impact Dye

  • Patina

    Clay Dye

    Medium green with light brown undertones

  • Port

    Clay Dye

    Deep brown with burgundy undertones

  • Pumpkin

    Low Impact Dye

    Medium red with orange and brown undertones

  • Raspberry

    Low Impact Dye

  • Sea

    Low Impact Dye

  • Slate

    Clay Dye

    Medium Grey

  • Stone

    Clay Dye

  • Sunstone

    Clay Dye

    Peach/coral with pink undertones

  • Tea

    Clay Dye

    Light brown with yellow undertones

  • Teal

    Low Impact Dye

  • Terra

    Clay Dye

    A burnt orange clay pot color

  • Topaz

    Clay Dye

    Soft medium brown

  • Turquoise

    Low Impact Dye

    Bright medium blue

  • Violet

    Low Impact Dye

    Bright purple with darker undertones

  • White

    No Dye

    True Bright White

Clay-dyed colors

As long as humans have been making textiles, they have been using mud, clay, and dirt to dye their creations. There are places in the world where cloth is still dyed using these traditional techniques. When we developed our own dyeing process, we learned from these ancient methods but took the process a step further to ensure colorfastness, durability, and applicability to knitted fabrics.
 
We use clays from different sources, but most come from the Southeastern United States (Alabama, Georgia, and the Carolinas). Because we want to produce a uniform color from batch to batch, we look for sources that will yield consistent color.
 
 
 
 
 
Not only does clay dyeing result in beautiful colors, but the process itself is eco-friendly. Clay dyeing avoids the use of synthetic dyes, thus eliminating the negative environmental impact of chemically manufacturing it. The dye process we developed uses only natural and biodegradable materials to improve the clay’s natural dyeing abilities. We do not use any salt; salt is routinely used in many “normal” dye processes, and releasing it results in high salinity that is harmful to our waterways.
 
We love how the idea of clay dye entices people. We began our company with only two or three colors. Over time, people began asking for more colors, and they began sending us clay samples. We have received clay from locations as varied as a car salesperson’s yard and a potter in Alabama who still uses a horse-and-pulley system to extract clay for his pottery. We also have created custom projects using a customer’s own soil and by adding brewed coffee to our clay dyes for a coffee roaster.
 
 
 
We achieve many of our shades by mixing and blending different clays together. Of course, there is a finite number of pigments available in nature, so we are limited in the colors that we can produce. But we are always looking for new and interesting sources.

Read About Our Fabrics

 

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